A garden enclosed by 6000 glass blocks | Optical Glass House by Hiroshi Nakamura

photos by Koji Fujii/Nacasa & Partners Inc. | click to enlarge

6000 glass blocks function much like an urban noren – allowing light and air to pass through while revealing only a mosaic of the lush garden inside.

The allure of the transparent has forever tickled the architect’s imagination. Especially in Japan, where space is of a premium and density is copious, the eternal dilemma of openness vs privacy is a primary theme throughout most portfolios. It’s only poetic that 17 years after renowned architect Kengo Kuma attempted his Water / Glass House, and 10 years after Hiroshi Nakamura left from under his wings, did this disciple reinvent the notion of the glass house.

Completed earlier this year and situated on a wide, busy street in Hiroshima, Nakamura’s Optical Glass House is composed of roughly 6000 glass blocks strung together by stainless steel. The soundproof blocks not only cancel out the bustling cars and trams but they also create a façade that functions much like an urban noren -allowing light and air to pass through while revealing only a mosaic of the lush garden inside.

Hiroshi Nakamura most recently completed his largest project ever: Tokyu Plaza in Omotesando. You can read all our stories on him here.

*gasp* … is this not the most exquisite sink you’ve ever seen?


source: @naparchitects

2 Comments

  1. The raindrop shadows on the floor below the pool? Gorgeous! I could sit there all day.

  2. Impressive!

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