japanese art, design and culture
Spoon-Tamago

Multi-Leveled Living | Case by Jun Igarashi

case by jun igarashi (1)

all photos by Daici Ano | click to enlarge

Hokkaido-based architect Jun Igarashi’s (previously) latest home is perhaps as close to tree-house living as you’ll find. Unless of course you live in an actual tree house. The multi-leveled home in Sapporo features a main living room with 23-ft high ceilings. Three different winding staircases access multiple level mezzanines, just like the platforms that are constructed on top of sturdy tree branches. The different levels are used as a study and a children’s playroom.

It’s certainly a unique way to make use of high ceilings but I can’t help but wonder: how could you let a child wander through this precarious jungle gym?

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source: dezeen

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3 comments

1 Nathan { 01.28.14 at 7:19 pm }

I really enjoy the cool stuff Japanese architects come up with using the very small plots of land they have for sale in this country. Every inch really does matter in these designs.

2 Sim { 01.30.14 at 2:43 pm }

The design is clean and elegant but this is also an example when the building is too emphasis on the design and neglected the safety of the family. If this house is design for adult only, its still acceptable but its not. The children play area is just scary too look at.

3 Bob Corrigan { 01.30.14 at 9:50 pm }

Beautiful but HORRIBLY DANGEROUS FOR CHILDREN (cough). Unless they bounce. Which children don’t.